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Top Ten Books This Week - Aug 06, 2018
Top Fiction And Non-fiction Works Of This Week | By Yentha
On Aug 06, 2018

 

Non-Fiction
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1.Laurent Alexandre:Do Robots Make Love:From AI to Immortality:Understanding Transhumanism in 12 Questions:Rs 399.00

As scientists in California make great strides in using advanced technology to enhance human intellect and physiology, the ethical and moral questions surrounding its possibilities have never been more pressing. Should we change the way we reproduce? Could we enhance the human body with technology to the point where we are all technically cyborgs? Is it possible to make love to a robot?Doctor and entrepreneur Laurent Alexandre and tech-philosopher Jean Michel Besnier go head to head on the big questions in an entertaining and thought-provoking debate on the fundamental principles of transhumanism.

2.Vivek Wadhwa:Your Happiness Was Hacked:Why Tech is Winning the Battle to Control Your Brain and How to Fight Back:Rs 599.00

We've become a tribe of tech addicts, and it's not entirely our fault.
Taking advantage of vulnerabilities in the human brain function, tech companies entice us to overdose on technology interaction. This damages our lives, work, families and friendships. Swipe-driven apps train us to evaluate people like products, diminishing our relationships. At work, we email on an average of seventy-seven times a day, ruining our concentration. At home, light from our screens contributes to epidemic sleep deprivation. But we can reclaim our lives without dismissing technology. The authors explain how to avoid getting hooked on tech and how to define and control the roles that it plays and could play in our lives. This profound and timely book turns personal observation into a handy guide to adapting to our new reality of omnipresent technology.

3.Eugenia Chang:The Art of Logic:How to Make Sense in a World that Doesn't:Rs 499.00

Emotions are powerful. In newspaper headlines and on social media, they have become the primary way of understanding the world. But strong feelings make it more difficult to see the reality behind the rhetoric. In the Art of Logic, Eugenia Cheng shows how mathematical logic can help us see things more clearly - and know when politicians and companies are trying to mislead us. Clear-sighted, revelatory and filled with useful real-life examples of logic and illogic at work, the Art of Logic is an essential guide to decoding modern life.

4.Tom Philips:Humans:A Brief History of How We Fucked It All Up:Rs 499.00

An exhilarating journey through the most creative and catastrophic f**k ups in human history, from our very first ancestor falling out of that tree, to the most spectacular fails of the present day. Perfect for fans of Sarah Knight and Giles Milton. This is HUMANS. In the seventy thousand years that modern human beings have walked this earth, we've come a long way. Art, science, culture, trade - on the evolutionary food chain, we're real winners. But, frankly, it's not exactly been plain sailing and sometimes - just occasionally - we've managed to really, truly, quite unbelievably f**k things up. From Chairman Mao's Four Pests Campaign, to the sinking of the Titanic, from the American Dustbowl, to the world's leading superpower electing a reality TV mogul as President it's pretty safe to say that, as a species, we haven't exactly grown wiser with age. So, next time you think you've really f**ked up, this book will remind you: it could be so much worse.

5.Arvind Gupta:How India Manages Its National Security:Rs 599.00

In this authoritative and comprehensive survey of the challenges a changing global security environment poses to India, former deputy national security advisor Arvind Gupta outlines the important aspects of the country's security apparatus and how they interface to confront internal and external conflicts. We have today a turbulent Middle East to the west; a rising and assertive China to the north; Pakistan in the grip of the military and the militants across our border and an increasingly militarizing Indian Ocean region surrounding us. Additionally, climate change, cyber security and the vulnerability of our space assets are major areas of concern. Anything that weakens a nation weakens its security, which makes the issues of food, water, health, economics and governance critically significant. Arvind Gupta draws on his long experience in these areas to argue that instead of tactical remedies, a strategic, coherent, institutional approach is needed to deal with these challenges. Strengthening the National Security Council, for instance, could be one way forward.How India Manages Its National Security explains with great clarity and thoroughness the concept and operation of India's national security apparatus. This book will be of great interest to practitioners, analysts and laymen alike and offer an important voice in the discussion on how national security challenges should be resolved in the decades to come.

Fiction
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1.Lynne Truss:A Shot in the Dark:Rs 499.00

The charming first novel in a new comic crime series, from one of Britain's most-loved writers, the incomparable Lynne Truss.Brighton, 1957. Inspector Steine rather enjoys his life as a policeman by the sea. No criminals, no crime, no stress.So it's really rather annoying when an ambitious - not to mention irritating - new constable shows up to work and starts investigating a series of burglaries. And it's even more annoying when, after Constable Twitten is despatched to the theatre for the night, he sits next to a vicious theatre critic who is promptly shot dead part way through the opening night of a new play.It seems Brighton may be in need of a police force after all.

2.Anita Sivakumaran:The Birth of Kali:Rs 299.00

How exactly did Draupadi share a one-room hut with her five husbands? What would be Bhishma’s story if it is told by his nemesis Sikandi? What kept Sitai occupied when Raman was out hunting deer and demons? What if Akalya knew it was Indra who came disguised to her as her husband? Twisty, dark and mischievous, these are tales from Indian mythology retold from a woman’s point of view. Here, the heroines tell their own stories, no holds barred.

3.J P Delaney:Believe Me:Rs 399.00

In this twisty psychological thriller from the New York Times and Sunday Times bestselling author of the Girl Before, an actress plays both sides of a murder investigation I'm just an actress. I wanted to stand on a stage and have people applaud. How on earth did I get into all this? Claire Wright likes to play other people. A struggling British actress, in New York without a green card, Claire needs work. She takes the only part she's offered: as a decoy for a firm of divorce lawyers, hired to entrap straying husbands, catching them on tape with their seductive propositions. The rules? Never hit on them directly. Make it clear you're available, but they have to proposition you, not the other way around. The firm is after evidence, not entrapment. The innocent should have nothing to hide. Then the game changes. When the police start investigating one of Claire's targets for murdering his wife - and potentially others too - they ask her to help lure their suspect into a confession. Claire can do this. She assumes a voice and an attitude, something from an old film noir. A masterclass in deception. But who's deceiving who? and that's when Claire realises she's playing the deadliest role of her life.

4.Novuyo Rosa Tshuma:House of Stone:Rs 699.00

Bukhosi has gone missing. His father, Abed, and his mother, Agnes, cling to the hope that he has run away, rather than been murdered by government thugs. Only the lodger seems to have any idea. Zamani has lived in the spare room for years now. Quiet, polite, well-read and well-heeled, he's almost part of the family - but almost isn't quite good enough for Zamani. Cajoling, coaxing and coercing Abed and Agnes into revealing their sometimes tender, often brutal life stories, Zamani aims to steep himself in borrowed family history, so that he can fully inherit and inhabit its uncertain future.

5.Riley Sager:Last Time I Lied:Rs 599.00

Have you ever played two truths and a lie? Emma has. Her first summer away from home, she learned how to play the game. And she learned how to lie. Then three of her new friends went into the woods and never returned. Now, years later, Emma has been asked to go back to the newly re-opened Camp Nightingale. She thinks she’s laying old ghosts to rest but really she’s returning to the scene of a crime. Because Emma’s innocence might be the biggest lie of all.

 
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